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    New College Grads See Better Employment Prospects for Second Year in a Row

    Last April, we wrote a blog about hiring predictions for new college graduates. At that time, the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) reported that hiring of 2011 graduates was expected to increase by a whopping 19.3 percent. It was a big step in the right direction after graduate employment prospects took a noticeable hit during the recession.

    But what about this year?

    Well, I am very happy to report that this positive trend is expected to continue!

    Larry Gordon of the Los Angeles Times also cites findings from a recent report by the Collegiate Employment Research Institute, which says, "Employers are now more optimistic about the college labor market than at any time since 2007.” Being a 2009 graduate, I remember what it felt like during my last year of college. It wasn’t easy trying to figure out what I was going to do after I graduated. Plus, all the negative talk about unemployment, college graduates struggling to find work and having to compete with older, more experienced job candidates certainly didn’t help.

    So believe me when I say this is good news. Granted, overall unemployment rates for college graduates under the age of 24 is still too high (6.2 percent) according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, their prospects continue to slowly improve, and are significantly better than people in the same age group with only a high school diploma (22.5 percent).

     

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